Posts tagged ‘Solar’

More Solar News

In a revolutionary leap that could transform solar power from a marginal, boutique alternative into a mainstream energy source, MIT researchers have overcome a major barrier to large-scale solar power: storing energy for use when the sun doesn’t shine.

Video: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2008/oxygen-0731.html

Improvements in alternative energy (Democrat), or drilling in the Artic National Wildlife Refuge and tax breaks for oil companies (Republican)? 

August 11, 2008 at 3:58 pm Leave a comment

Solar Stocks

Thin Film Solar Panel

Thin Film Solar Panel

DayStar Technologies DSTI is attempting to elminate the two barriers to the big panels: $$ and looks.  They’re risky – but on the upside, they’re one of the early guys with Thin Film solar panels.  Thin film is avoids the higher cost of silicon (currently in limited supply), and is not as visually unappealing (Panels are embedded into the roof tiles instead of a big eyesore on the roof).  More: https://goearth.wordpress.com/2008/07/29/solar-upwards-and-onwards/

Seems like there are a lot of players in the solar market. For the industry as a whole, it’s going up – but the individual companies in the industry?  Some will have to go!  The big solar companies like STP and FSLR might be less volatile – but as far as a cheap-ass stock…DSTI is interesting and its smaller size will allow it move quicker.   

Another roll of the dice is WorldWater & Solar Technologies (WWAT.OB)- a penny stock.  Another a high-risk stock, but…for less than a $1 it’s worth a look.  They’ve just completed the largest solar airport install in the US, are breaking ground on a project in New Jersey and just signed another in California.
http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/080716/20080716005552.html?.v=1 http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/080714/20080714005630.html?.v=1 http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/080708/20080708005694.html?.v=1 

There’s also a SOLAR ETF and a WIND ETF that are both around $23 right now.  These invest in the entire industry so they’re less risky. 

Solar ETF is TAN
Wind ETF is PWND

Intel, IBM, and National Semiconducter are also moving into the solar industry.  When companies if this move in, results will follow.  
 

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July 30, 2008 at 3:49 pm Leave a comment

Solar – Upwards and Onwards

 Solar – Nowhere to go but up.  Businesses are going Greenand with the advent of thin film, more are turning to solar and the advent of thin film helps move it along.  Thin film is made with a new semiconducter called copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS).  It allows for very thin panels. Solar panels can now be integrated onto roof tiles instead of the massive silicon panels mounted on rooftops.  The drawback is that they are less efficient than the larger & thicker silicon panels.

“Solar power today is where air conditioning was in 1950 — everything is a window unit designed for retrofit on existing construction — its more expensive, its not as good, its not as a cost effective,” Langdon said. “But by 1960 no one built a building without saying ‘Should I put a central air system in?’ – and the same thing is going to happen with solar.” said Bret Adams, a spokesperson for DayStar (DSTI).

The number of solar installations in the United States rose 45 percent to 150 megawatts in 2007, according to the Solar Energy Industry Association, or the equivalent of the total energy use of about 37,500 homes.

A 45% increase is still less than 40,000 homes?  Seems like there’s a lot of room for growth – let’s see:

Total solar capacity of 3,400 MW, not including pool or lighting systems, was less than 1 percent of U.S. annual use last year, leaving plenty of room for growth. 

 http://www.reuters.com/article/marketsNews/idINN1826474420080721?rpc=44&pageNumber=1&virtualBrandChannel=0

July 29, 2008 at 3:11 pm 1 comment


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